The Catholic University of America

Environmental Health & Safety Manual


 
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11 - CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY SOURCES (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT)

Section Contents
 

11.1 PURPOSE
 
11.2 SCOPE
 
11.3 BACKGROUND
 
11.4 DEFINITIONS
 
11.5 RESPONSIBILITIES
 
11.6 TRAINING
 
11.7 REQUIREMENTS FOR LOCKOUT/TAGOUT DEVICES
 
11.8 LOCKOUT/TAGOUT PROCEDURE
 
11.9 GROUP LOCKOUTS/TAGOUTS
 
11.10 SHIFT CHANGE
 


 


11.1

PURPOSE

This program provides a standard operating procedure to control hazardous energy sources for the servicing and maintenance of equipment where unexpected energization or start-up could harm employees.

11.2

SCOPE

This program applies to all University employees who service and maintain equipment. Contractors who do work for Catholic University must have their own lockout/tagout program and provide their own locks and tags to ensure compliance with the OSHA standard and the University Contractor Safety Guide.

11.3

BACKGROUND

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) under 29 CFR 1910.147 and 1910.333 regulates the servicing and maintenance of equipment where unexpected energization or start-up of the equipment could harm employees. To control the unexpected energization of equipment, energy sources must be locked out and tagged out prior to servicing and maintenance. Examples of common energy sources are:

  • Electrical
     
  • Mechanical
     
  • Gravity
     
  • Hydraulic
     
  • Fluid & Gases
     
  • Thermal
     
  • Pneumatic
     
  • Water under pressure
     
Examples of the type of work to which this standard applies are:

  • Repairs
     
  • Renovation
     
  • Replacement of parts
     
  • Adjustments
     
  • Removal or by-passing of equipment guard(s) during servicing

11.4

DEFINITIONS

Affected Employee: A staff, student or faculty member whose job requires the operation of equipment subject to lockout/tagout. Someone who works in an area where lockout/tagout is used.

Authorized Employee: A staff, student or faculty member who physically locks or tags out equipment for servicing or maintenance work. This individual is not necessarily the person who normally operates the equipment.

Energized: Connected to an energy source or containing residual or stored energy.

Energy Source: Any source of electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal, or other energy.

Lockout: Process of blocking the flow of energy from a power source to a piece of equipment and keeping it blocked out by means of a lockout device.

Lockout Device: Lock, block, or chain which keeps a valve, disconnect switch, or lever in the off or closed position. Lockout locks are provided by your department. Use them only for lockout/tagout purposes.

Tagout: The placement of a tagout device on a power source. The tag acts as a warning not to restore energy; it does not serve as a physical restraint.

Tagout Device: A prominent warning device, such as a tag and a means of attachment, which can be securely fastened to a power source. The tag must clearly state DO NOT OPERATE or another similar message.

11.5

RESPONSIBILITIES

Environmental Health & Safety (EHS):

  • Maintain the written program.
     
  • Facilitate training for affected departments upon request.
     
  • Audit the program annually; update as necessary.

Department Directors and Managers:

  • Ensure that all employees working with machines or equipment which contain hazardous energy sources understand all lockout/tagout procedures and receive training.
     
  • Ensure compliance with all aspects of the lockout/tagout program.
     
  • Identify authorized employees.
  • Communicate the University lockout/tagout program to potential contractors.

Employees:

  • Comply with all aspects of the lockout/tagout program.
     
  • Receive training in lockout/tagout procedures and work safely.

11.6

TRAINING

All authorized employees must be trained in the following:

  • Recognition of hazardous energy sources,
     
  • Specific energy sources within the work place,
     
  • How to isolate and control this energy.

All affected employees must be trained in the purpose and use of lockout/tagout and the importance of not restarting locked out or tagged out equipment.

Retraining is necessary when there is a change in procedures, equipment, job duties.

Department directors/managers will record and maintain a file of all trained personnel listing the employee name and date of training.

11.7

REQUIREMENTS FOR LOCKOUT/TAGOUT DEVICES

A lockout device (such as a padlock) used in lockout procedures can work with a key or with a combination. The lockout device must meet the following requirements:

  • Durable enough for the heat, cold, humidity, or corrosiveness in the area where it's used, for as long as it's needed.
     
  • Strong enough so it can't be removed without heavy force or tools like bolt cutters.
     
  • Used only for lockout procedures.

Tagout devices act as a warning not to restore energy; they are not a physical restraint. Tagout devices must meet the following requirements:

  • Strong and resilient enough to prevent accidental loss or removal.
     
  • Used only for tagout.
     
  • Strong enough so it won't release with less than 50 pounds of applied force.
  • Attachable by hand.
     
  • Contain space to identify the authorized employee, date, and time.
     
  • Have a printed warning such as "Danger" or "Do Not Operate".

11.8

LOCKOUT/TAGOUT PROCEDURE

Personnel may refer to this flow chart for a summary of established protocol for servicing affected equipment.

 

Lockout/Tagout Flow Chart


Complete this Lockout/Tagout Procedure form to detail written procedures for specific machines or individual equipment with more than one energy source requiring control prior to service.

11.9

GROUP LOCKOUTS/TAGOUTS

In cases where more than one person will service or maintenance a piece of equipment or machinery that requires lockout/tagout, a multiple lockout adapter must be used. This device can hold several locks and tags.

Each authorized employee will place his or her lock on the adaptor. Only the person who placed a lock on the device may remove the lock. The only exception allowed would be if a person discontinued working on a job. In this situation the supervisor must remove the lock and tag.

11.10

SHIFT CHANGE

In cases where the next shift of personnel will continue to work on a locked-out piece of equipment, the employee reporting for duty must apply his or her lock and tag first, then the employee who is leaving may remove his or her lock and tag.